Holidaze

The big box retail chains must be getting to me. It is not even Thanksgiving and am starting to get the itch to listen to Blue over and over again punctuated only by this or this or thisย . In a weak moment, I purchased some copper steampunk twinkle lights last weekend, and am researching ways to make the perfect pomander. I really like celebrating.

Those of you that know me know I do so without even the littlest smidgeon of care over affiliation. I am not Jewish, but nary a Tashlich goes by without Ol Krasley sending her transgressions into the river. I am known to pull a two story tall chariot carrying the Supreme Personality Godhead down Fifth Avenue each June sinceย the time right in the beginning of college when I was so moved by the Bhagavad Gita that I nearly became a Hare Krishna.

While I think rising from dead is extremely impressive, I am not Christian, but always spend Easter in London with my best friend because they just do Spring so well over there in Ol Blighty with all the crocuses and chocolate bunnies and beautiful Liberty calicoes. I once made an entire dinner party based off of Paris 1919 (blood orange mimosas, Graham Greene tea, Welsh rarebit, and so on). And, well, I’ve already goneย on and on about Hanguel Day.

There will beย two new holidays in my lineupย next year and I wanted to tell you all about them. They are both about quiet and reverence and well, I am very excited to celebrate them! Does anyone know where to get a big block of tofu???

On February 8th, I will most likely celebrate Hari Kuyo, a Japanese festival dedicated to old and broken needles. In Japan, hundreds of women gather in Shinto temples and stick broken needles into blocks of tofu in homage to the little tools in our lives that are often unseen and under-appreciated. Burying the needles in tofu is symbolic of giving them a restย after working so hard over the year.ย Ryojo Shioiri, a monk interviewed in an article on Hari Kuyo remarked that “Sometimes there are painful things and secrets that women can’t tell men, and they put these secrets into the pins and ask the gods to get rid of them,”

Photo courtesy of: sakepuppets.com/tag/sewing-needles/

Photo courtesy of: sakepuppets.com/tag/sewing-needles/

Nyepi, the Balinese New Year is on a sliding schedule, but fell in mid-March last year. It is a Hindu tradition that involves a day of complete rest and quiet. No planes are allowed to fly over Bali on Nepi. No cars are on the streets. No conversation. No fires. No television. No Tech Crunch. No mindfulness apps. Just self reflection. Apparently tourists can’t even play the “we didn’t know” card and are discouraged from leaving their hotels on this day.

I am not sure who these gentleman are or what they are doing in relation to Nyepi, but they look cool.

I am not sure who these gentleman are or what they are doing in relation to Nyepi, but they look cool.

I have a good feeling about next year…yours.sk

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